Importance of Preparing for Hurricane Season

Today, Wednesday June 1, marked the official start of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season that runs through the end of November. June 1 should serve as an important reminder about the need for individuals to be prepared for any emergency. This may be the start of the hurricane season, but emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere, and everyone needs to be prepared – not just those folks in hurricane-prone states.

Florida residents should check their personal preparations and emergency kits, note any alerts or messages from local emergency officials, and rehearse emergency evacuation routes. Emergency kit supplies should last at least seventy-two (72) hours.

Important items to have ready in case of an emergency include a battery-powered radio, flashlight, extra batteries, medicine, non-perishable food, hand-operated can opener, utility knife and first aid supplies. All important documents should be copied and stored in a waterproof bag. These may include medical records, contracts, property deeds, leases, banking records, insurance records and birth certificates.

When preparing for hurricane season and potential emergencies, the needs of all members of a household should be considered. If a household includes a person with a disability, special steps to assist them may be necessary and should be incorporated into all emergency planning.

Pets also require special handling. They may become agitated during the onset of a storm, so a pet carrier is a must for safe travel. Pet owners should research pet boarding facilities now within a certain radius of where they may evacuate, since animals may not be welcome in all shelters or hotels.

The beginning of hurricane season is also the time to ensure that their Associations maintain the proper insurance coverage, including both hazard and flood insurance coverage. Not only are homes and businesses in hurricane-prone states at risk for flooding, but inland flooding is common.
Mirza Basulto & Robbins, LLP, also reminds our Association clients to confirm that their insurance policies are in full force and effect and adjust deductibles as necessary.

We highly recommend Associations consult with their banks to obtain a line of credit or loan. In case of casualty loss, you must be prepared to cover potential expenses

As a cautionary tale, we have added a link to an article published in the Sun-Sentinel, as to the horrors of not maintaining a hazard and/or flood insurance policy. As a member of the Board of Directors, you have a fiduciary duty to the unit owners to ensure maintenance of such policies (and a personal liability if such policies are not maintained). Insurance premiums may be financed and/or loans may be obtained to finance the acquisition of such policies if not already in place. We encourage you to contact our office should you require more information in this regard.

In the event of the occurrence of any event that is covered under the Association’s insurance policies in effect, we encourage your Association to contact our firm to discuss the filing of a claim.

 

Originally posted at http://www.mbrlawyers.com/